Interview With Andreas Thust – Artist

Andreas Thust
Andreas Thust
http://andreas-thust.artistwebsites.com

When did you first become interested in art?

I can’t tell the usual story of a child being creative since it could hold a pencil. I did some photography in my teenage years and was surprisingly successful, having small exhibitions at local stores and cafes. After beginning to study physics I did not have time left for such “useless stuff”. In the course of my scientific career I was so far away from the world of arts, as an artist might be away from quantum physics. About a decade ago I found myself in a serious life crisis and started to be creative silently and without any purpose. From today’s perspective I would say that this marked the beginning of a long and very successful self-healing process. My works reflect therefore very strongly the aspects of spirituality and transcendency.

What style of art do you use most?

I prefer still lifes, surrealism, and also abstract style.

Has your style changed from when you first began as an artist?

Since I am not too long in this field, I am not aware of any substantial changes.

What medium do you use?

Besides some photography, my main medium is 3-dimensional computer rendering. Basically, a model scene is created in the computer by defining coordinates and textures. Then, the light rays travelling from the model to the eye of the observer are calculated by mathematical formulas. That’s why this technique is also called raytracing.

So Shiny ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
So Shiny ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

What made you choose that medium?

Since I am a scientist, having no practical experience with brushes and pencils, the idea to use the computer is quite obvious. I am very grateful for this wonderful possibility.

Do your ideas come from life or imagination?

Clearly from imagination.

How do you choose your images and colours?

The images appear suddenly in front of my inner eye. They are there and already finished. I just need to bring them to “paper”, which sometimes works well, and sometimes also fails due to my limited technical skills.

Sky Cafe ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Sky Cafe ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Do you work in a studio?

No. I fear I am boring in this respect. I am a couch worker, with a laptop on my knees 🙂

Who is your favourite artist?

Caspar David Friedrich (German romantic landscape painter, 1774 – 1840)

What is your favourite piece of work by yourself?

The work is entitled “Sacred Spaces”. It expresses best my spiritual visions.

Sacred Spaces ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Sacred Spaces ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

How much time (on average) does it take to complete a work?

Between a couple of hours and a couple of days. Things, which look straightforward for a painter, can be tedious with a computer, and some things which are difficult for a painter, can be done in a snap using a computer.

How well do you take criticism?

I am a very independent person. I don’t see my artistic expression under performance pressure, in the sense that I should meet someone’s quality expectations. Therefore: quite irrelevant.

What do you do to overcome a ‘block’?

In the beginning I was quite intimidated by such a cease of creativity, thinking even that I had come to an end with my artistry. Meanwhile, I learned that this is a big chance for the evolution of new things, just like a crisis can be a chance in life. So, I just wait and complain a little bit 🙂

How do you know something is ‘finished’? Is it easy to walk away?

A quite difficult topic! When the work is in progress, I am highly enthusiastic. When finished, I am not sure, whether it’s good enough, and whether I should change or add something. Sometimes, I really start to hate the whole thing. But after a couple of days or weeks I am normally reconciled again.

Object No 5 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Object No 5 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Have you had exhibits in galleries?

No. Since I work full time in a highly competitive scientific field, I cannot afford the time needed for an engagement beyond the creative process itself.

What are you currently working on?

I am desperately waiting for my summer vacation allowing me to become active again. Meanwhile, I bridge the time by playing around with creative ideas in my mind.

What are your plans for the future?

Since I am not a professional artist, I just keep on what I am doing.

What was the best advice given to you as an artist?

Do what you like to do!

Oasis ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Oasis ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

What advice would you give new artists?

As a non-professional artist, I hesitate to give advices. The most important thing for me was to keep my creativity out of any performance pressure. In this way I can maintain the originality and power of my work.

Have you done any courses to help you?

No. I am autodidactic, as in many other fields of life!

What do you do to market your work?

Not much. Just some exposition and (sometimes winning) contests on fineartamerica, without being too eager. The personal recognition by renowned artists, which I get there, is so much more important to me than the aspect of selling.

Do you use social networking in your day to day life?

Except for fineartamerica, I do not participate in social networks. I am quite suspicious about these things, and the recent PRISM scandal confirms me now even more in my opinion.

Have you got hobbies?

Many. Meeting and spending time with inspired and intelligent people is the most important for me. I love science, philosophy, psychology, cooking and travelling. And I like driving my sports car. Meanwhile, I do also a little bit of real sports every second day.

Heaven ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Heaven ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Where are you based?

I was born and raised in the Austrian Alps. Now I live in Cologne, Germany.

If you enjoyed this interview and are creative yourself, with a body of work to show us
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